Measuring (Project) Health

You’d think I would follow my own advice when it comes to my own health.  When dealing with project deliverables or tasks, I like to get feedback from the team as often as I can.  Ideally, I recommend daily feedback.  Realistically, there are extended team members who you don’t deal with on a daily basis.  Due to their expertise, you may need to share this person with others on the program.  Notice I didn’t call him or her a “resource”.  Anyway, you need to make sure you do a few things, when interacting with these team members.  One, identify the maximum amount of time that will elapse between interactions.  Two, identify some threshold criteria.  Exceed the threshold and you should be interacting with this team member.

Now, I’ve followed this prescription in the past, when dealing with experts like Software Architects.  Seriously, it doesn’t matter the title of the person we’re talking about.  What’s important is you know you have maybe one or two of these types on your program.  The other important thing to note is if you don’t do either of these things, you run the risk of this coming back and biting you.

3 indicators you’ve gone too far

  1. You have not interacted with your expert within the predefined timeframe
  2. You have not interacted with your expert after a threashold has been exceeded
  3. Your expert has prescribed Levofloxacin to you

About Derek Huether

I'm an Enterprise Agile Coach at LeadingAgile. I have a goal to take the hand waving out of Agile, Kanban, & Scrum. I’m a strange combination of a little OCD, a little ADHD, a lot of grit, and a lot of drive. I come from a traditional PM background but I don't give points for stuff done behind the scenes. The only thing that counts is what you get done and delivered. Author of Zombie Project Management (available on Amazon)