About Author: Derek Huether

Website
http://www.derekhuether.com
Description
I'm an Enterprise Agile Coach at LeadingAgile. I have a goal to take the hand waving out of Agile, Kanban, & Scrum. I’m a strange combination of a little OCD, a little ADHD, a lot of grit, and a lot of drive. I come from a traditional PM background but I don't give points for stuff done behind the scenes. The only thing that counts is what you get done and delivered. Author of Zombie Project Management (available on Amazon)

Posts by Derek Huether

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Top 10 Negative Personas of a Daily Standup Meeting

standingAll Agile teams should be holding a daily standup meeting.  Don’t think of it as a daily planning meeting. Think of it as a daily opportunity to have a shared understanding of what is getting done and what lies ahead.  During a daily standup meeting, participants sometimes exhibit negative behavior that will detract from the meeting.  As an empowered team, it is your job to self-manage and encourage good behavior. Some of these behaviors are so common, we don’t even realize people are doing them. So, I’m giving them some names. Next time you hold a daily standup, see if anyone (including yourself) exhibits any of these 10 behaviors.

Rather than using the list as a means to label others, use it to reflect on yourself. How might others be perceiving you? Is the persona you are projecting counter to your goals? 

If you think of some behaviors that should be added to the list, I would love to see them.

Daily Standup Meeting Negative Personas

 

10. Pat Decker the Obsessive Phone Checker

This person does not always pay attention and is constantly look at her (or his) phone. Did a BFF just like something? Did someone on Twitter just favorite that pic of the team board? In addition to checking her phone, she likes to share what she sees with others during the standup. “Pssst, Bob, check out this Vine video or pic on Instagram”. She’s not so loud that she’s overly disruptive but now Bob missed what someone else said during the standup.

9. Stephen Craig who is Always Too Vague 

This person can get stuck on the same task for days but doesn’t want anyone to know. When speaking to the team, they are crazy vague. Stephen will offer very few details until the team pushes for a deadline. He (or she) will use language like “Yesterday I was working on task 123 and today I will be working on it some more”. No other information is volunteered. When asked if they need any help, they clarify they have no blockers or risks.

8. Bobbie Bainer the Team Complainer

When the attention is on Bobbie, get ready for the positive energy to be sucked right out of the room. Bobbie complains, complains, and complains some more. Management, teammates, or the technology is all fare game. Everything and everyone sucks and no one knows just how bad they have it. Don’t bring up religion or politics unless you want Bobbie to go right into a 20 minute tirade.

7. Jess Jewler who loves the Water Cooler

Jess comes to the daily standup to talk, but not about what needs to be done today. Instead, he or she will talk about just about everything else. The next 15 minutes is dedicated to the water cooler. Did you see the last episode of House of Cards or The Walking Dead?  Are you going to watch the Ravens play this weekend?  My son plays Minecraft and constructed this totally awesome building with redstone. Anything is fair game, as long as it’s not about work.

6. Billy Platitude with the Bad Attitude

Billy is a leftover from a bygone era. He was the best of the best mainframe developers and all he needs is a DLD and he’ll give you what you need… in a few months. You want any changes between now and then? Forget it!  He thinks all things agile are stupid and just plays along begrudgingly. You may catch him make cynical “funny” comments at standup to point out how right he is about how stupid agile is.

5. Will Funky the Non-Committal Junkie

Will does not want to be painted into a corner. Typically, he uses language like try, maybe, pretty sure, I’ll get back to you, we’ll see, would like to think, soon, almost. You’ll also see Will be the last person to comment on something and will usually go with the crowd.

4. Tom Mater the Specialty Updater

Tom only gives vague commitments, usually understandable only by those in his discipline. The overall team gains little value from the statements. If you ask him for details, he’ll either tell you to look it up in a tool or he’ll be very technical in his response. Half of the team doesn’t understand what the hell he’s talking about.

3. Drue Gru who thinks he’s Better Than You (and the team)

Drue has been around for a long time. He’s better than you and he knows it.  If you need him, you know where to find him. He either arrives to the standup meeting late or he doesn’t come at all.  He has little to say because you wouldn’t understand what he’s talking about. He already knows everything so what is he to gain by slumming with you and the team for 15 minutes? Let him know when something important happens. *sarcasm*

2. Pearl Revolver the Problem Solver

Pearl means well but she lacks a sense of time. She wants to have in-depth problem solving discussions on obstacles identified during the standup meeting. She’s very curious what issues others are having because she’s going to want to talk it out and fix it right then and there. Even if there is a reserved 15 minutes after the standup, Pearl figures there is no better time than the present to tackle a challenge.

1. Ian Krumpter the Interrupter

Do you listen or do you wait to talk?  Stop and think about that. There is a difference. Ian waits to talk. People can be binary in that way. If you’re talking, you’re less likely to be listening. He wants to prove just how awesome he is so you’ll see him interrupt even if the topic doesn’t really apply to him.

 

Thank you to the other coaches at LeadingAgile for their contribution to this post. The original post was dated March 17 over at the LeadingAgile blog.

Image Credit: Pictofigo

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Derek Huether Presenting at Agile 2014 in Orlando, Florida

Presenting Agile 2014It’s official. I’m going to be presenting at Agile2014 in Orlando this summer. My 75-minute session will be part of an Learning track that is targeted at anyone who struggles with getting their work done.

My session will be on Wednesday, July 30 at 09:00 in the Sarasota Room. 

Hope to see you all in Florida!

At home and work, how to get more stuff done. An introduction to Personal Kanban.


Submitted: Tue, 2014-01-14 01:40 Updated: Tue, 2014-01-14 01:43
Presenter: Derek Huether
Track: Learning Session Type: Workshop Audience Level: Learning
Room Setup: Rounds Duration: 75 minutes
Keywords: Learning, Process, kanban, flow, personal, WIP, Personal_Agility, process improvement

Abstract:

With a world of constant distraction, it feels like it’s getting harder and harder to get stuff done, regardless if it’s on a personal or organizational level. At some point, we’ve been sold the lie that multitasking is great and maximum utilization is even better. If we all drank the Kool-Aid, why are we doing more and getting less done? If there were a relatively simple way for you to get more stuff done, wouldn’t you want to know what it was? If there were a way for you to measure and improve your processes over time, wouldn’t you want to know how to do that as well? When getting stuff done is a primary measure for success, we need to introduce people to concepts that are simple but can be leveraged at scale.

In this session, participants will be introduced to the principles of Lean and the application of Kanban to visualize their personal work, limit distraction and waste, and get stuff done. I’ll cover the core concepts outlined in Jim Benson and Tonianne DeMaria Barry’s book, Personal Kanban, to get you started. I’ll talk about how Kanban can be applied to everyday work and why you should do it.

Through my years of struggling with ADD/ADHD and my years of management, leadership, and coaching, I have learned and applied Personal Kanban techniques in my everyday life and Lean Kanban at both government and private organizations. This is your opportunity to experience what I am like after a few cups of coffee and for you to learn a few simple strategies that you can start using before you even leave Agile 2014. This workshop can help you map your work and navigate your life.

 

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Product Owner and the Scrum Team

iiba baltimoreOn March 11, 2014, I presented a talk to IIBA Baltimore on the topic of the Product Owner and the Scrum Team.  I have to say, this was an awesome bunch of people to talk with.  You know you’re at the right place when they offer beer and crab cakes with dinner.  Gotta love Charm City!

The last 10 years of Agile have focused on the team. I believe the next 10 years of Agile will focus on the enterprise. That said, should the Product Owner continue to be a single person or does it need to evolve as well? Let’s cover the basics and then see how LeadingAgile has been successful at leveraging the Product Owner role at scale.

iiba promo code

As a thank you to IIBA, I was able to get a promo code for 50% off an upcoming Agile Requirements Workshop. The code “IIBA” is limited to only 5 seats.  Are you a business analyst in the Atlanta area or want to go visit some friends in Atlanta?  Take advantage of this limited offer.

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Agile Engine Metaphor

carI recently published a post over at the LeadingAgile website. I compared and agile transformation to a carburetor engine.

It was based on an interesting exchange I had on Google+ about Agile process transformation successes and failures. Here is one of the comments from the other person. Tell me if it sounds familiar.

My previous employers had big problems with Agile. Attempted to use it multiple times and had a nice failure rate of 100%. As far as I know, they are trying again. I’m rather curious. Would be interesting to know how it turns out this time.

If you like it or not, I can pretty much guarantee that company mentioned above will fail again, if they don’t have the proper organizational structure, governance, and clearly defined criteria for progress and success. In other words, their agile process engine is going to stall.

If you’ve never started a car built before 1990, you need to realize that just turning the key won’t get the engine running. All it will do, especially if it’s cold, is crank away until the battery is dead as a door nail. Instead, you need to set the choke to allow the engine to suck in lots of raw gas so some of the vapor will ignite.

Read the complete blog post…

Image Credit: Pictofigo

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Bad UX on a Menu

popeyesI took the family to Popeyes this weekend.  I’m not the fast food type so this is about as close as it gets for me.  I’m also not one who eats biscuits or drinks a lot of soda.  Why eat at Popeyes, you ask?  It was Sunday and Chick-fil-A was closed. Lastly, I am not a UX (user experience) expert.

I scanned the menu and I noticed a 2 Loaded Chicken  popeyes_combosWrap option.  It’s basically 2 chicken tenders, beans and rice, wrapped in a tortilla.  I was good with that but I only noticed the price for the combo at $6.59.  As noted in bold letters at the bottom of this menu sign, combos include a regular side, a biscuit and regular sized drink. I figured that was a reasonable price and would work for me.  I would normally just get the main course, some beans and rice, and a cup of water.  My plan was to give the biscuit to my son.

What happened?  I received 2 chicken wraps, a side of beans and rice, and a 22 ounce cup. I’m not complaining about being charged for a massive 22 ounce cup for soda, when I would have been happy to get a free cup of water.  What I was a little pissed about was I didn’t get a biscuit to give to my son.

I informed the cashier that she forgot my biscuit.  She pointed at the sign and stated, I’m sorry but number 10 and 11 don’t get a biscuit.

I then looked at the sign again. My eyes drawn to the word combo.  I then looked at the wickedly small text next to the word wraps.

Biscuit not included

Are you kidding me?  It’s not like I’m trying to buy $9.99 knives off an infomercial and the shipping and handling will cost me $49.99 (written in the footer in super tiny sub-text).  I’m at a restaurant getting a sandwich.

I looked at all of the other menu cells that had combos 1-9. None of them included the combos statement in the footer.  So, they inaccurately framed this message and deceived me through bad design. I will never order a combo from Popeyes again. If I return, I will only order a sandwich, a side, and a water.  They will actually lose money from me over time.

Word to the wise.  Don’t try to trick your customers.  Be upfront with them. Be honest with them.  Use simple design and language so things like this don’t happen.  You’re only hurting yourself.

Have you every been tricked by bad UX?  I would love to hear your story.

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