Agile Archive

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Vote for my AgileDC Personal Kanban Workshop

Submitting my Personal Kanban workshop to AgileDC

This year, AgileDC will be held October 21 at the Kellogg Conference Center at Gallaudet University.  Coming off the popularity and success of my Personal Kanban workshop at Agile2014, I decided to submit an encore workshop to the AgileDC conference

agileDC

I need your help!

Unlike in prior years where the conference organizers picked who would make the cut and who would not, this year it appears they are using Conference Engine and crowd sourcing it.

 How does it work?

1. Click on the link that takes you to my session

http://confengine.com/agiledc/proposal/515/at-home-and-work-how-to-get-more-stuff-done-an-introduction-to-personal-kanban  You and read about my proposed session. If you weren’t at Agile2014, this will be an encore workshop.

2. Click on the heart to “vote up” my workshop

3. Go to the Login page.  Login with one of your favorite social networks. (see image)

Log in

 

 

 

4. You may get routed back to the main Confengine website. If that’s the case, click on my link again.

5. Click on the heart to “vote up” my workshop

 

Your vote is much appreciated!


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Feedback from Agile2014 Personal Kanban workshop

wowThe votes and comments are in!

A little over a week ago, I led a Personal Kanban workshop at Agile2014.  It was to be both informative and interactive. Below is what Agile Alliance sent me.

Dear Derek Huether,

Thank you for presenting at the Agile Alliance Agile2014 Conference; your session helped make the conference a real success!

Please find attached the raw feedback data (including comments) for your session entitled “At home and work, how to get more stuff done. An introduction to Personal Kanban”, in which 14 attendees left feedback.

The feedback questions are based on a 5 rating scale, with 5 being the highest score.

Your average ratings are shown below:

  • Session Meets Expectations: 4.57
  • Recommend To Colleague: 4.71
  • Presentation Skills: 4.71
  • Command Of Topic: 4.86
  • Description Matches Content: 4.79
  • Overall Rating: 4.79

Screenshot 2014-08-09 09.26.34

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Lean Coffee Baltimore Topics for August

lean-coffee-aug

Lean Coffee Topics in dot-voted order

Lean Coffee is a structured, but agenda-less meeting. Participants gather, build an agenda, and begin talking. Conversations are directed and productive because the agenda for the meeting was democratically generated. We met at Mad City Coffee at 07:30 . We enjoyed an hour and a half of coffee and conversation.

August Topics

Distributed Teams

When everyone in your company is distributed, what are some ways you can stay connected?

Paired Programming

How do you sell paired programming to your organization? Management sees it as one for the price of two.

Test Driven Development

How exactly does it work?  We hear that it’s a good thing but why?

Method Turf Wars

Coaches and consultants get so passionate about the frameworks they promote. It used to be Waterfall against Agile.  Now it’s seemingly SAFe , Scrum at scale, enterprise Kanban and Lean… For the customers, do they really care? They just want stuff to work!

Meetups and Conferences

Have you been to any good meetups or conferences lately?  Do you know of any upcoming events?

Conversations

We had some really good conversations around the topics. Rather than bullet them out here, I’ll respond in the comments to encourage a little conversation.

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My Personal Kanban deck at Agile2014

Here is the deck from my Agile2014 workshop on Personal Kanban.

Participants were introduced to the principles of Lean and the application of Kanban to visualize their work, limit distraction and waste, and get stuff done. I covered the core concepts outlined in Jim Benson and Tonianne DeMaria Barry’s book, Personal Kanban, to get attendees of my workshop started.

Click here for Agile 2014 Workshop Tasks.pdf, referenced in my workshop

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Top 10 Negative Personas of a Daily Standup Meeting

standingAll Agile teams should be holding a daily standup meeting.  Don’t think of it as a daily planning meeting. Think of it as a daily opportunity to have a shared understanding of what is getting done and what lies ahead.  During a daily standup meeting, participants sometimes exhibit negative behavior that will detract from the meeting.  As an empowered team, it is your job to self-manage and encourage good behavior. Some of these behaviors are so common, we don’t even realize people are doing them. So, I’m giving them some names. Next time you hold a daily standup, see if anyone (including yourself) exhibits any of these 10 behaviors.

Rather than using the list as a means to label others, use it to reflect on yourself. How might others be perceiving you? Is the persona you are projecting counter to your goals? 

If you think of some behaviors that should be added to the list, I would love to see them.

Daily Standup Meeting Negative Personas

 

10. Pat Decker the Obsessive Phone Checker

This person does not always pay attention and is constantly look at her (or his) phone. Did a BFF just like something? Did someone on Twitter just favorite that pic of the team board? In addition to checking her phone, she likes to share what she sees with others during the standup. “Pssst, Bob, check out this Vine video or pic on Instagram”. She’s not so loud that she’s overly disruptive but now Bob missed what someone else said during the standup.

9. Stephen Craig who is Always Too Vague 

This person can get stuck on the same task for days but doesn’t want anyone to know. When speaking to the team, they are crazy vague. Stephen will offer very few details until the team pushes for a deadline. He (or she) will use language like “Yesterday I was working on task 123 and today I will be working on it some more”. No other information is volunteered. When asked if they need any help, they clarify they have no blockers or risks.

8. Bobbie Bainer the Team Complainer

When the attention is on Bobbie, get ready for the positive energy to be sucked right out of the room. Bobbie complains, complains, and complains some more. Management, teammates, or the technology is all fare game. Everything and everyone sucks and no one knows just how bad they have it. Don’t bring up religion or politics unless you want Bobbie to go right into a 20 minute tirade.

7. Jess Jewler who loves the Water Cooler

Jess comes to the daily standup to talk, but not about what needs to be done today. Instead, he or she will talk about just about everything else. The next 15 minutes is dedicated to the water cooler. Did you see the last episode of House of Cards or The Walking Dead?  Are you going to watch the Ravens play this weekend?  My son plays Minecraft and constructed this totally awesome building with redstone. Anything is fair game, as long as it’s not about work.

6. Billy Platitude with the Bad Attitude

Billy is a leftover from a bygone era. He was the best of the best mainframe developers and all he needs is a DLD and he’ll give you what you need… in a few months. You want any changes between now and then? Forget it!  He thinks all things agile are stupid and just plays along begrudgingly. You may catch him make cynical “funny” comments at standup to point out how right he is about how stupid agile is.

5. Will Funky the Non-Committal Junkie

Will does not want to be painted into a corner. Typically, he uses language like try, maybe, pretty sure, I’ll get back to you, we’ll see, would like to think, soon, almost. You’ll also see Will be the last person to comment on something and will usually go with the crowd.

4. Tom Mater the Specialty Updater

Tom only gives vague commitments, usually understandable only by those in his discipline. The overall team gains little value from the statements. If you ask him for details, he’ll either tell you to look it up in a tool or he’ll be very technical in his response. Half of the team doesn’t understand what the hell he’s talking about.

3. Drue Gru who thinks he’s Better Than You (and the team)

Drue has been around for a long time. He’s better than you and he knows it.  If you need him, you know where to find him. He either arrives to the standup meeting late or he doesn’t come at all.  He has little to say because you wouldn’t understand what he’s talking about. He already knows everything so what is he to gain by slumming with you and the team for 15 minutes? Let him know when something important happens. *sarcasm*

2. Pearl Revolver the Problem Solver

Pearl means well but she lacks a sense of time. She wants to have in-depth problem solving discussions on obstacles identified during the standup meeting. She’s very curious what issues others are having because she’s going to want to talk it out and fix it right then and there. Even if there is a reserved 15 minutes after the standup, Pearl figures there is no better time than the present to tackle a challenge.

1. Ian Krumpter the Interrupter

Do you listen or do you wait to talk?  Stop and think about that. There is a difference. Ian waits to talk. People can be binary in that way. If you’re talking, you’re less likely to be listening. He wants to prove just how awesome he is so you’ll see him interrupt even if the topic doesn’t really apply to him.

 

Thank you to the other coaches at LeadingAgile for their contribution to this post. The original post was dated March 17 over at the LeadingAgile blog.

Image Credit: Pictofigo